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Schedule in February 2014


The 12th Perceptual Frontier Seminar: Biodiversity in Perception

Date and time: 18 February 2014, 17:00-19:00
Venue: Room 411, 1st floor of the Build. 4, Ohashi Campus, Kyushu University

Program

1. Changes in optic flow perception precede locomotor development
Nobu SHIRAI* and Tomoko IMURA**
*Niigata University, **Niigata University of International and Information Studies
We examined the interactive developmental process between voluntary locomotor actions and perception of optic flow, a critical cue for perceiving and controlling the direction of locomotion, in infancy. A pair of cross-sectional (Experiment 1) and longitudinal (Experiment 2) investigations was conducted to test infants' visual preferences for several optic flows (radial expansion, contraction, clockwise rotation and counterclockwise rotation) and their locomotor state. Results suggest that the visual preference for contraction flow drastically decreases just before the emergence of locomotion, and offer a new perspective on the development of visuomotor coordination; change in particular visual perception precedes and potentially promotes the emergence of related motor actions in early development.

2. Object recognition behind the slit viewing by chimpanzees and human infants
Tomoko IMURA*
*Niigata University of International and Information Studies
While human adults tend to process global features before analyzing local features on the visual object recognition (global precedence effect), nonhuman primates, avian species, or human infants show little or no tendency of the global precedence. The present study examined the ability to integrate global motion and global form information in chimpanzees and human adults (Experiment 1), and 3 to 12-month-old human infants (Experiment 2) by using a slit-viewing task. The results suggest that humans were superior to chimpanzees in the ability to integrate spatio-temporal information and such ability emerges by 5 month of age in human infants.

3. The effect of context on color preference
Chihiro HIRAMATSU* and James ANDERSON**
*Kyushu University, **University of Stirling
Preference for colors might be contextual, and a color preferred in a certain context may give rise to avoidance in another context. In this study, we investigated whether contexts affect monkeys' behavior toward color. Squirrel monkeys preferred colors associated with their daily foods in a foraging context, but the effect was opposite when the color was a background on which food was placed, suggesting that contexts or experiences modulate color preferences.

--Break: During the break, auditory demonstrations about time perception, provided by Yoshitaka NAKAJIMA, will be presented via iPads.--

4. Gustation and feeding behavior in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster
Teiichi TANIMURA*
*Department of Biology, Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University
We are interested in knowing how the feeding behavior of Drosophila is regulated by gustation and internal mechanisms. We showed that Drosophila do not simply respond to taste stimulus, but regulate the feeding behavior through a decision-making process. Drosophila can learn the nutritional value of non-sweet sugar. They also have an ability to modulate their feeding preference to amino acids depending on the internal nutritional state.

5. Acoustic tracking of FM bats using microphone array system
Ikuo MATSUO*, Alyssa WHEELER**, Laura KLOEPPER**, Jason GAUDETTE**, James A. SIMMONS**
*Tohoku Gakuin University, **Brown University
The purpose of this research is to clarify the changes of acoustic characteristics of echolocation calls according to environments. These acoustic characteristics were computed by tracking the flight path of the bat from the time differences of arrivals (TDOA) at the microphone array system in the flight room. It was clarified that the amplitudes of echolocation calls were changed according to complexity of environment.

After the Seminar, we will get together at Kazuo UEDA's office, 709, 7th floor of the Build. 3.

Photos


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